dehron:

Showcase: Craig Mullins (http://www.goodbrush.com/)

Period concept art

bongmeblazer:

soul-assassins:

smokinthefurrr:


The people should not be afraid of their government. The
government should be afraid of their people.

Holy fucking shit is this relevant.

This needs 1 million notes

Reblog this every fucking time I see it

bongmeblazer:

soul-assassins:

smokinthefurrr:

The people should not be afraid of their government. The

government should be afraid of their people.

Holy fucking shit is this relevant.

This needs 1 million notes

Reblog this every fucking time I see it

(Source: amurderousgroove)

  • Landlocked Blues

Landlocked Blues
by Bright Eyes

lavenderoilgirl:

you think after 22 years I’d be used to the spin

this song pulls my heart strings for several reasons

(Source: impudent-strumpet)

blissfullydope:

babycakesbriauna:

jellyroll22:

officialalltimelow:

THIS IS FUCKING HORRIFYING

This is not cool!

The fuck

Wtf

(Source: bellerophonnow)

drake-tears:

lightlyfloating:

thotnun:

Emma Watson’s response to the nude photo leak threats

Literally a goddess.

I’m in love.

drake-tears:

lightlyfloating:

thotnun:

Emma Watson’s response to the nude photo leak threats

Literally a goddess.

I’m in love.

(Source: fkabe)

  • Honest Sleep

Honest Sleep
by Touche Amore

shaunamariexx:

radtacular:

Touche Amore//Honest Sleep

I’ve probably said too much, but I’ve never felt more accomplished.

conejitavx:

thepeoplesrecord:

Furious students burn Mexican government building in protest over police corruption, demand justice for missing students
October 16, 2014

Hundreds of residents in a southern-Mexican city smashed up the state capital building in a furious protest over the continued lack of information about 43 local college students, believed to have been abducted by corrupt police.

The local police are allegedly working with a powerful drug cartel and it’s feared that 10 newly discovered mass graves may contain the bodies of the students taken on September 26. “Up to 20” charred remains were discovered on Saturday.

As an investigation is underway, 26 police officers have so far been arrested, a number of which admitted to working with the Guerreros Unidos – an infamous drug cartel. Arrest warrants have also been issued for the mayor of Iguala, Jose Luis Albarca, his wife and his security chief, but they have gone into hiding.

The building in Chilpancingo, the capital of Guerrero state, was seen from a distance, engulfed in flames. 
According to local authorities, the crowds included hundreds of students and teachers from the Ayotzinapa teachers’ college, who blockaded the building and used sticks, rocks and Molotov cocktails to attack it.

They initially tried to get into the state congress, but police in riot gear repelled the crowd.

This comes more than two weeks after a serious incident in Iguala, also in Guerrero state, involving the shooting of six students by police during a rally in support of rural teachers’ rights. The law enforcers opened fire on a bus carrying protesters and arrested dozens of students, who have not been seen since.

The situation touches on a problem that’s been plaguing Mexico for a long time – police corruption and rampant organized crime by ruthless cartels.

Monday’s events come after a case of mistaken identity, during which the police shot and wounded German student Kim Fritz Keiser of the Monterey Institute of Technology, according to state authorities.

Keiser was travelling with her other foreign classmates in a van from Acapulco, which passes through Chilpancingo. At the time, the police were involved in another, unrelated confrontation with kidnappers, and erroneously assumed the people in the van had some sort of connection with the kidnapping. The state prosecutor’s office told AP that, as the officers tried to pull the van over, some crackling sound resembling a gunshot was heard from inside the vehicle. The police shot back, wounding the student.

Fearing that it was a case of armed men kidnapping students, the driver of the van refused to stop and drove away from the scene.

The officers involved in the incident have been detained and their weapons are being examined, authorities say.

Warnings have been issued by US authorities in the past to avoid the northwestern part of the state of Guerrero, because of frequent violence occurring in places like Iguala.

Source

Hyfr


Consolation, 1894, Edvard Munch

Consolation, 1894, Edvard Munch

(Source: laclefdescoeurs)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Noah Addis

Future Cities

According to United Nations estimates there are more than a billion squatters living today—one out of every six people on earth. This number is expected to double to two billion by 2030. And by the middle of the century there will be three billion squatters.

 Future Cities is a series of photographs of informal settlements and unplanned developments in the world’s cities. These communities take on many forms, but they share a common history. People, mostly migrants from rural areas, came to the city in search of work. They were in need of affordable housing that could not be found on the open market. So they claimed a small piece of unused land and built a home. Other residents followed, and the result was a new community within the city.

 Although they face many challenges, these settlements are extremely creative and vibrant places and it would be a mistake to ignore them. Governments around the world have failed to take responsibility for this massive urban migration.  Many of the world’s squatters exist in a legal vacuum, working outside of the official economy and living with only tenuous rights to the ground on which they have built their homes.

 It is all too easy to look at the people who live under these difficult circumstances as victims. The reality is that the people living in informal communities throughout the world don’t need handouts or for people to tell them how to live. Instead, they have very specific needs. They need land tenure or a pathway to property ownership, which gives them a real stake in the new community they are building. They need access to credit and financial services, so that they can leverage their home ownership into capital that can be used to start businesses. They need education for their children along with basic utilities and city services, such as clean water, sanitation and electricity.

 Many of these needs are not currently being met as cities struggle with ways to deal with a rapid influx of rural migrants. Yet strong evidence suggests that when these basic needs are met, these new urban settlements can become thriving communities.

 My interest in photographing informal developments comes from the fact that these settlements grow almost organically to suit the needs of the people who live there. I am interested in looking at these communities to see what can be learned from them about urban planning and sustainable development. In addition, I hope to use the photographs from this project to raise awareness of the issues faced by the more than five million people each month who migrate from rural areas into the cities of the developing world. (artist statement)

introvert-loser:

Van Gogh’s “The Starry Night” and Hokusai’s “The Great Wave off Kanagawa” in one painting

introvert-loser:

Van Gogh’s “The Starry Night” and Hokusai’s “The Great Wave off Kanagawa” in one painting